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Does Santa Have Glass Shower Panels?

There are a lot of things we know about Santa Claus – and an awful lot of things we don’t know. When it comes to what his bathroom looks like and whether or not they have glass shower panels up at the North Pole or whether there are glass railings on the balcony overlooking the workshop, well that’s definitely something we can only wonder about. 

Nevertheless, House and Home reported on a log cabin in the North Pole that is decorated like Santa’s house. Or at least what someone imagines Santa’s house to look like. You or I might have different ideas dancing in our heads on these long winter nights, but it’s still fun to take a peek at this chill abode!

Santa’s Cabin in the Woods

The folks at House and Home start off by saying, “If Santa Claus were real, his house would look something like this rustic log cabin in the North Pole. Though it may look more like the set of a Christmas movie, this real house was decorated by its owner to look and feel like somewhere Santa would live.”

We don’t want to ruffle any feathers, but since when does Santa live in a log cabin? Haven’t these folks ever watched any of the Christmas specials on TV? We like to think of Santa ensconced in a castle with plenty of room for his workshop and all of those busy little elves – something like the one featured in the 1964 classic Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. 

But for now, we’ll play along. 

According to House and Home, the log cabin is “Described as “a toy-lover’s paradise nestled on 25 idyllic acres at the North Pole — perfect for spirited reindeer games” in the listing, the vintage log house was built in the 1800s and renovated in 2013 with modern-day amenities.” 

The home has 2,500 square feet – not quite a castle, but not exactly a cozy little cabin, either – three bedrooms and two bathrooms. 

Based on the picture of Santa’s bathroom that House and Home ran, which shows a red plaid shower curtain rather than a chic clear glass shower enclosure, we would have to say he is more of a traditional guy. But if he is ever interested in updating his décor with frameless glass shower doors, we would love to help!

A Clear Look at the History of Glass: Part 1

Here at Florida State Glass and Mirror, we owe a debt of gratitude to the Mesopotamians. Without their ingenuity, which gave us not only glass but also the first form of writing and the wheel among many other things, we would not be able to offer you our beautiful clear glass shower enclosures or frameless glass balcony railings

We don’t know exactly how the Mesopotamians managed to develop a method for making glass, but we are awfully glad they did! 

The Early Chapters in the History of Glass

While many questions remain about the introduction of glass, Historians think that the discovery was first made about 4,000 years ago – maybe more – in Mesopotamia! “Scholars believe that the ability to make glass developed over a long period of time from experiments with a mixture of silica-sand or ground quartz pebbles – and an alkali,” the experts at the Corning Museum of Glass tell us. 

“Other high heat industries, including ceramics and metalworking, could have inspired early glassmakers. Perhaps the development of glass began with potters firing their wares. Could the first glass have been colorful, hard, shiny decoration fused to a clay pot’s surface in the heat of the furnace? No one knows,” they say.

What we do know is that Pliny the Elder, a Roman military commander, author and philosopher who died in 79 AD, got it wrong. He credited the Phoenicians with the discovery of glass. The Phoenicians may have been superb sailors, who came up with a set of letters that would eventually become the alphabet we use today, but they were not the first to make glass, as Pliny would have us believe.

According to the Corning Museum of Glass, Pliny said that Phoenician sailors accidentally discovered glass when they made a cooking fire on the beach. “Though this is an interesting explanation, this scenario is not possible since a cooking fire cannot reach the melting temperature of glass, and the story most likely involved Ptolemais because its beach sand was historically known to be heavily used for glassmaking,” they say.

It may not seem like much compared to the ancient Mesopotamians and Phoenicians, but here at Florida State Glass and Mirror, we are very proud of our history as a family-owned and operated business with more than 20 years of experience working with high-quality glass products, including glass shower panels and glass railings.